Daimler’s dirty diesel defeat device deal: $1.5 billion to say sorry


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A Mercedes-Benz diesel from the 1980s ignites exhaust fumes in London.  People expected the diesel engines of this old model to be dirty, but we had the right to expect that the diesel engines sold over the past decade would comply with emissions laws.  It turns out that they don't.
Zoom in / A Mercedes-Benz diesel from the 1980s ignites exhaust fumes in London. People expected the diesel engines of this old model to be dirty, but we had the right to expect that the diesel engines sold over the past decade would comply with emissions laws. It turns out that they don’t.

Richard Oliver / Getty Images

In 2020 it seems more and more popular Read about it US Environmental Protection Agency Roll back the pollution laws or Arguing that big business It should be It allows her to do whatever she wants. But the agency sometimes appears to function as intended. Earlier this week, with the US Department of Justice and the California Air Resources Board, it held Daimler AG – the parent company of Mercedes-Benz – responsible for the sale of diesel cars with emission devices.

The EPA and CARB found that not everything was right with the Daimler diesel engines in the wake 2015 Volkswagen emissions scandal. The Environmental Protection Agency told Daimler that it is in the process of carrying out some additional testing of the company’s four and six-cylinder diesel engines “using the drive cycles and conditions that might reasonably be expected to be encountered in normal operation and use, for the purposes of investigating the possibility of a device defeat.”

By doing this, he discovered several auxiliary emission controllers not described in Homogenization papers Submitted by Daimler. In total , Around 160,000 Sprinter trucks and nearly 90,000 Mercedes-Benz cars Between the 2009 and 2016 model years.

Show me sorry

As a result, Daimler will pay $ 875 million in civil fines, and $ 70.3 million in other fines. It will also have to pay a recall fee to repair its 250,000 diesel engines. All of them will require a new nitrogen oxide (NOx) filter and a software update, but many of them will also require additional parts, including new copper catalysts, diesel particulate filters, sensors, and even new instrument panels.

That would cost the company an additional $ 436 million, and it couldn’t hang around either. The settlement requires 85 percent of Mercedes-Benz passenger cars to be recalled and repaired within two years, and 85 percent of the Sprinter trucks must be repaired within three cars, with “severe penalties” for failure.

During the company’s checkbook release, Daimler will also pay California $ 110 million to fund pollution mitigation projects within the state, and 15 new locomotive engines have been ordered to replace some of the old and dirt engines. On top of those financial sanctions, Daimler employees are undergoing more compliance training in their futures as part of the company’s reforms aimed at preventing this kind of thing from happening again.


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